Element:
Earth Earth

[23]

Yang - controlling line Yin line Yin line Yin line Yin line Yin line

Dispersion
Peeling off

flay, collapse

Lake
Heaven
Guài [43] Eruption; Breakthrough
Opposite
Earth
Wood
[24] Return; Turning back
Inverse
Earth
Earth
Kūn [2] Receptor; Responding
Mutual

month Month 9 ; Host or Controlling line : 6
剥: 攸往. Bō: bù lì yǒu yōu wǎng.

Bo indicates that (in the state which it symbolizes) it will not be advantageous to make a movement in any direction whatever.

: 剥, 剥, 柔变. 攸往, . , 观. 消息盈虚, . Tuàn zhuàn: Bō, bō yě, róu biàn gāng yě. Bù lì yǒu yōu wǎng, xiǎo rén zhǎng yě. shùn ér zhǐ zhī, guān xiàng yě. Jūn zǐ shàng xiāo xi yíng xū, tiān xíng yě.

Bo denotes overthrowing or being overthrown. We see (in the figure) the weak lines (threatening to) change the (last) strong line (into one of themselves). That 'it will not be advantageous to make a movement in any direction whatever' appears from the fact that the small men are (now) growing and increasing. The superior man acts according to (the exigency of the time), and stops all forward movement, looking at the (significance of the) symbolic figures (in the hexagram). He values the processes of decrease and increase, of fulness and decadence, (as seen) in the movements of the heavenly bodies.

: , 剥; , 宅. Xiàng zhuàn: Shān fù dì shang, bō; shàng yǐ hòu xià, ān zhái.

(The trigrams representing) the earth, and (above it) that for a mountain, which adheres to the earth, form Bo. Superiors, in accordance with this, seek to strengthen those below them, to secure the peace and stability of their own position.

young yang young yin young yin young yin young yin changing yin
I Ching transform
Mountain
Wood
[27] Nutrition; Nourishment
Change
: 剥床, 蔑凶. Chū liù: bō chuáng yǐ zú, miè zhēn xiōng.

The first ‘six’, divided, shows one overturning the couch by injuring its legs. (The injury will go on to) the destruction of (all) firm correctness, and there will be evil.

: 剥床, . Xiàng zhuàn: Bō chuáng yǐ zú, yǐ miè xià yě.

'He overthrows the couch by injuring its legs:' - thus (he commences) his work of ruin with what is lowest (in the superior man).

young yang young yin young yin young yin changing yin young yin
I Ching transform
Mountain
Water
Méng [4] Initiation; Immaturity
Change
: 剥床辨, 蔑凶. Liù èr: bō chuáng yǐ biàn, miè zhēn xiōng.

The second ‘six’, divided, shows one overthrowing the couch by injuring its frame. (The injury will go on to) the destruction of (all) firm correctness, and there will be evil.

: 剥床辨, . Xiàng zhuàn: Bō chuáng yǐ biàn, wèi yǒu yǔ yě.

'He destroys the couch by injuring its frame:' - (the superior man) has as yet no associates.

young yang young yin young yin changing yin young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Mountain
Mountain
Gèn [52] Immobility; Stillness
Change
: 剥, . Liù sān: bō zhī, wú jiù.

The third ‘six’, divided, shows its subject among the rebels; but there will be no error.

: 剥, . Xiàng zhuàn: Bō zhī wú jiù, shī shàng xià yě.

That 'there will be no error on the part of this one among the rebels' arises from the difference between him and the others above and below.

young yang young yin changing yin young yin young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Fire
Earth
Jìn [35] Rapid advance; Gain ground
Change
: 剥床肤, 凶. Liù sì: bō chuáng yǐ fū, xiōng.

The fourth ‘six’, divided, shows its subject having overthrown the couch, and (going to injure) the skin (of him who lies on it). There will be evil.

: 剥床肤, 切. Xiàng zhuàn: Bō chuáng yǐ fū, qiè jìn zāi yě.

'He has overthrown the couch, and (proceeds to injure) the skin (of him who lies on it):' - calamity is very near at hand.

young yang changing yin young yin young yin young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Wind
Earth
Guān [20] Vision; Contemplation
Change
: 贯, 宠, . Liù wǔ: guàn yú, yǐ gōng rén chǒng, wú bù lì.

The fifth ‘six’, divided, shows (its subject leading on the others like) a string of fishes, and (obtaining for them) the favor that lights on the inmates of the palace. There will be advantage in every way.

: 宠, 终. Xiàng zhuàn: Yǐ gōng rén chǒng, zhōng wú yóu yě.

'He obtains for them the favor that lights on the inmates of the palace:' - in the end there will be no grudge against him.

changing yang young yin young yin young yin young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Earth
Earth
Kūn [2] Receptor; Responding
Change
: 硕果, 舆, 剥庐. Shàng jiǔ: shuò guǒ bù shí, jūn zǐ dé yú, xiǎo rén bō lú.

The topmost ‘nine’, undivided, shows its subject (as) a great fruit which has not been eaten. The superior man finds (the people again) as a chariot carrying him. The small men (by their course) overthrow their own dwellings.

: 舆, . 剥庐, 终. Xiàng zhuàn: Jūn zǐ dé yú, mín suǒ zài yě. Xiǎo rén bō lú, zhōng bù kě yòng yě.

'The superior man finds himself in a carriage:' - he is carried along by the people. 'The small men (by their course) overthrow their own dwellings:' - they can. never again be of use to them.

This translation of the YiJing classic text uses the original Chinese including the Xiàng zhuàn commentary converted to modern simplified characters and pinyin. The English translation is based on William Legge (1899) which is now out of copyright. We have changed some wording and converted to American spelling. We hope to replace this with a more modern translation.
In the first few paragraphs each gua is described. The name of the gua (hexagram) is followed by the two trigrams that make it up (lake, mountain, fire, water, earth, heaven, thunder and wind). Each gua has a controlling element (earth, fire, water, metal and wood). After this information there are three related guas. The Opposite gua is the one where all yang is changed to yin and yin to yang - it is usually opposite in meaning. The Inverse gua is the gua with the order inverted so first is last and vice versa. The mutual gua is a more complex combination and re-ordering of the internal trigrams making up the gua. Then the association of the gua to the annual cycle is shown - this is the Chinese lunar month number (not Western month). The controlling or host yao is considered the most important line in the gua and is highlighted in the hexagram.
The main description for the hexagram is then followed by a section for each of the six possible changing lines which indicate the transformation into another, related gua. The text uses ‘nine’ to refer to a yang line and ‘six’ for a yin line. The pure yin and yang hexagrams have, however, a different text structure as they are so important.

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