Element:
Earth Earth

Dà Xù [26]

Yang - controlling line Yin line Yin line Yang line Yang line Yang line

Impeded
Great nourishment

obstruction

Lake
Earth
Cuì [45] Condensation; Gathering
Opposite
Heaven
Wood
Wú Wàng [25] Unforeseen; Honesty
Inverse
Wood
Lake
Guī Mèi [54] Union; Marrying Maiden
Mutual

month Month 8 ; Host or Controlling line : 6
畜: , , . Dà xù: lì zhēn, bù jiā shí jí, lì shèdà chuān.

Under the conditions of Da Xu it will be advantageous to be firm and correct. (If its subject do not seek to) enjoy his revenues in his own family (without taking service at court), there will be good fortune. It will be advantageous for him to cross the great stream.

: 畜, , , 贤. , . , 养贤. , 应. Tuàn zhuàn: Xiàng zhuàn: Dà xù, gāng jiàn dǔ shí huī guāng, rì xīn qí dé, gāng shàng ér shàng xián. néng zhǐ jiàn, dà zhèng yě. bù jiā shí jí, yǎng xián yě. lì shèdà chuān, yīng hū tiān yě.

In (the trigrams composing) Da Xu we have (the attributes) of the greatest strength and of substantial solidity, which emit a brilliant light; and indicate a daily renewal of his virtue (by the subject of it). The strong line is in the highest place, and suggests the value set on talents and virtue; there is power (in the upper trigram) to keep the strongest in restraint: - all this shows ‘the great correctness’ (required in the hexagram). ‘The good fortune attached to the subject’s not seeking to enjoy his revenues in his own family‘ shows how talents and virtue are nourished. ’It will be advantageous to cross the great stream:‘ - (the fifth line, representing the ruler,) is responded to by (the second, the central line of Qian, representing) Heaven.

: , 畜; , . Xiàng zhuàn: Tiān zài shān zhōng, dà xù; jūn zǐ yǐ duō shí qián yán wǎng xíng, yǐ xù qí dé.

(The trigram representing) a mountain, and in the midst of it that (representing) heaven, form Da Xu. The superior man, in accordance with this, stores largely in his memory the words and deeds of former men, to discharge the accumulation of his virtue.

young yang young yin young yin young yang young yang changing yang
I Ching transform
Mountain
Wind
[18] Corruption; Decay
Change
: . Chū jiǔ: yǒu lì lì yǐ.

The first ‘nine’, undivided, shows its subject in a position of peril. It will be advantageous for him to stop his advance.

: , . Xiàng zhuàn: Yǒu lì lì yǐ, bù fàn zāi yě.

'He is in a position of peril; it will be advantageous for him to stop his advance:' - he should not rashly expose himself to calamity.

young yang young yin young yin young yang changing yang young yang
I Ching transform
Mountain
Fire
[22] Pattern; Elegance
Change
: 舆輹. Jiǔ èr: yú shuō fù.

The second ‘nine’, undivided, shows a carriage with the strap under it removed.

: 舆輹, . Xiàng zhuàn: Yú shuō fù, zhōng wú yóu yě.

'(He is as) a carriage from which the strap under it has been removed:' - being in the central position, he will incur no blame.

young yang young yin young yin changing yang young yang young yang
I Ching transform
Mountain
Lake
Sǔn [41] Diminution; Reduction
Change
: 逐, . 舆卫, 攸往. Jiǔ sān: liáng mǎ zhú, lì jiān zhēn. yuē xián yú wèi, lì yǒu yōu wǎng.

The third ‘nine’, undivided, shows its subject urging his way with good horses. It will be advantageous for him to realize the difficulty (of his course), and to be firm and correct, exercising himself daily with his chariot and methods of defense; then there will be advantage in whatever direction he may advance.

: 攸往, . Xiàng zhuàn: Lì yǒu yōu wǎng, shàng hé zhì yě.

'There will be advantage in whatever direction he may advance:' - (the subject of) the topmost line is of the same mind with him.

young yang young yin changing yin young yang young yang young yang
I Ching transform
Fire
Heaven
Dà Yǒu [14] Profusion; Great harvest
Change
: 牿, . Liù sì: tóng niú zhī gù, yuán jí.

The fourth ‘six’, divided, shows the young bull, (and yet) having the piece of wood over his horns. There will be great good fortune.

: , . Xiàng zhuàn: Liù sì yuán jí, yǒu xǐ yě.

'The great good fortune indicated by the fourth ‘six’, (divided),' shows that there is occasion for joy.

young yang changing yin young yin young yang young yang young yang
I Ching transform
Wind
Heaven
Xiǎo Xù [9] Taming; Small accumulation
Change
: 豮豕牙, . Liù wǔ: fén shǐ zhī yá, jí.

The fifth ‘six’, divided, shows the teeth of a castrated hog. There will be good fortune.

: , . Xiàng zhuàn: Liù wǔ zhī jí, yǒu qìng yě.

'The good fortune indicated by the fifth ‘six’, (divided),' shows that there is occasion for congratulation.

changing yang young yin young yin young yang young yang young yang
I Ching transform
Earth
Heaven
Tài [11] Elevation; Advance
Change
: 衢, . Shàng jiǔ: hé tiān zhī qú, hēng.

The sixth ‘nine’, undivided, shows its subject (as) in command of the firmament of heaven. There will be progress.

: 衢, . Xiàng zhuàn: Hé tiān zhī qú, dào dà xíng yě.

'In command of the firmament of heaven:' - the way is grandly open for movement.

This translation of the YiJing classic text uses the original Chinese including the Xiàng zhuàn commentary converted to modern simplified characters and pinyin. The English translation is based on William Legge (1899) which is now out of copyright. We have changed some wording and converted to American spelling. We hope to replace this with a more modern translation.
In the first few paragraphs each gua is described. The name of the gua (hexagram) is followed by the two trigrams that make it up (lake, mountain, fire, water, earth, heaven, thunder and wind). Each gua has a controlling element (earth, fire, water, metal and wood). After this information there are three related guas. The Opposite gua is the one where all yang is changed to yin and yin to yang - it is usually opposite in meaning. The Inverse gua is the gua with the order inverted so first is last and vice versa. The mutual gua is a more complex combination and re-ordering of the internal trigrams making up the gua. Then the association of the gua to the annual cycle is shown - this is the Chinese lunar month number (not Western month). The controlling or host yao is considered the most important line in the gua and is highlighted in the hexagram.
The main description for the hexagram is then followed by a section for each of the six possible changing lines which indicate the transformation into another, related gua. The text uses ‘nine’ to refer to a yang line and ‘six’ for a yin line. The pure yin and yang hexagrams have, however, a different text structure as they are so important.

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