Element:
Fire Fire

[30]

Yang line Yin line Yang line Yang line Yin - controlling line Yang line
Adherence
Brightness

mesh of a net

Water
Water
Kǎn [29] Flow; Darkness
Opposite
Fire
Fire
[30] Adherence; Brightness
Inverse
Lake
Wind
Dà Guò [28] Surpassing; Excess
Mutual

Mid-Summer (Summer Solstice) ; Host or Controlling line : 2
离: , . 畜牝, . Lí: lì zhēn, hēng. chù pìn niú, jí.

Li indicates that, (in regard to what it denotes), it will be advantageous to be firm and correct, and that thus there will be free course and success. Let (its subject) also nourish (a docility like that of) the cow, and there will be good fortune.

: 离, ; , , , . 柔, ; 畜牝. Tuàn zhuàn: Lí, lì yě; rì yuè lì hū tiān, bǎi gǔ cǎo mù lì hū tǔ, chóng míng yǐ lì hū zhèng, nǎi huà chéng tiān xià. róu lì hū zhōng zhèng, gù hēng; shì yǐ chù pìn niú jí yě.

Li means being attached to. The sun and moon have their place in the sky. All the grains, grass, and trees have their place on the earth. The double brightness (of the two trigrams) adheres to what is correct, and the result is the transforming and perfecting all under the sky. The weak (second line) occupies the middle and correct position, and gives the indication of 'a free and successful course;' and, moreover, 'nourishing (docility like that of) the cow' will lead to good fortune.

: 离, . Xiàng zhuàn: Míng liǎng zuò lí, dà ren yǐ jìmíng zhào yú sì fāng.

(The trigram for) brightness, repeated, forms Li. The great man, in accordance with this, cultivates more and more his brilliant (virtue), and diffuses its brightness over the four quarters (of the land).

young yang young yin young yang young yang young yin changing yang
I Ching transform
Fire
Mountain
[56] Wandering; Journeying
Change
: 履错然, 敬. Chū jiǔ: lǚ cuò rán, jìng zhī wú jiù.

The first ‘nine’, undivided, shows one ready to move with confused steps. But he treads at the same time reverently, and there will be no mistake.

: 履错敬, . Xiàng zhuàn: Lǔ: cuò zhī jìng, yǐ bì jiù yě.

'The reverent attention directed to his confused steps' is the way by which error is avoided.

young yang young yin young yang young yang changing yin young yang
I Ching transform
Fire
Heaven
Dà Yǒu [14] Profusion; Great harvest
Change
: 离, . Liù èr: huáng lí, yuán jí.

The second ‘six’, divided, shows its subject in his place in yellow. There will be great good fortune.

: , . Xiàng zhuàn: Huáng lí yuán jí, dé zhòng dào yě.

'The great good fortune (from the subject of the second line) occupying his place in yellow' is owing to his holding the course of the due mean.

young yang young yin young yang changing yang young yin young yang
I Ching transform
Fire
Wood
噬嗑 Shì Kè [21] Gnawing; Eradicating
Change
: 离, 鼓缶, 则嗟, 凶. Jiǔ sān: rì zè zhī lí, bù gǔ fǒu ér gē, zé dà dié zhī jiē, xiōng.

The third ‘nine’, undivided, shows its subject in a position like that of the declining sun. Instead of playing on his instrument of earthenware, and singing to it, he utters the groans of an old man of eighty. There will be evil.

: 离, . Xiàng zhuàn: Rì zè zhī lí, hé kě jiǔ yě.

'A position like that of the declining sun:' - how can it continue long?

young yang young yin changing yang young yang young yin young yang
I Ching transform
Mountain
Fire
[22] Pattern; Elegance
Change
: 突, 焚, , 弃. Jiǔ sì: tū rú qí lái rú, fén rú, sǐ rú, qì rú.

The fourth ‘nine’, undivided, shows the manner of its subject's coming. How abrupt it is, as with fire, with death, to be rejected (by all)!

: 突, . Xiàng zhuàn: Tū rú qí lái rú, wú suǒ róng yě.

'How abrupt is the manner of his coming!' - none can bear with him.

young yang changing yin young yang young yang young yin young yang
I Ching transform
Heaven
Fire
Tóng Rén [13] Aggregation; Fellowship
Change
: 涕沱若, 戚嗟若, . Liù wǔ: chū tì tuó ruò, qī jiē ruò, jí.

The fifth ‘six’, divided, shows its subject as one with tears flowing in torrents, and groaning in sorrow. There will be good fortune.

: , 离. Xiàng zhuàn: Liù wǔ zhī jí, lí wáng gōng yě.

'The good fortune attached to the fifth ‘six’, divided),' is due to its occupying the place of a king or a prince.

changing yang young yin young yang young yang young yin young yang
I Ching transform
Wood
Fire
Fēng [55] Abundance; Plentitude
Change
: , 嘉折, 获, . Shàng jiǔ: wáng yòng chū zhēng, yǒu jiā zhé shǒu, huò fěi qí chǒu, wú jiù.

The topmost ‘nine’, undivided, shows the king employing its subject in his punitive expeditions. Achieving admirable (merit), he breaks (only) the chiefs (of the rebels). Where his prisoners were not their associates, he does not punish. There will be no error.

: , . Xiàng zhuàn: Wáng yòng chū zhēng, yǐ zhèng bāng yě.

'The king employs him in his punitive expeditions:' - the object is to bring the regions to a correct state.

This translation of the YiJing classic text uses the original Chinese including the Xiàng zhuàn commentary converted to modern simplified characters and pinyin. The English translation is based on William Legge (1899) which is now out of copyright. We have changed some wording and converted to American spelling. We hope to replace this with a more modern translation.
In the first few paragraphs each gua is described. The name of the gua (hexagram) is followed by the two trigrams that make it up (lake, mountain, fire, water, earth, heaven, thunder and wind). Each gua has a controlling element (earth, fire, water, metal and wood). After this information there are three related guas. The Opposite gua is the one where all yang is changed to yin and yin to yang - it is usually opposite in meaning. The Inverse gua is the gua with the order inverted so first is last and vice versa. The mutual gua is a more complex combination and re-ordering of the internal trigrams making up the gua. Then the association of the gua to the annual cycle is shown - this is the Chinese lunar month number (not Western month). The controlling or host yao is considered the most important line in the gua and is highlighted in the hexagram.
The main description for the hexagram is then followed by a section for each of the six possible changing lines which indicate the transformation into another, related gua. The text uses ‘nine’ to refer to a yang line and ‘six’ for a yin line. The pure yin and yang hexagrams have, however, a different text structure as they are so important.

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