Element:
Water Water

Jiǎn [39]

Yin line Yang - controlling line Yin line Yang line Yin line Yin line

Obstruction
Hardship

lameness, retardation

Fire
Lake
Kuí [38] Opposition; Diversity
Opposite
Wood
Water
Xiè [40] Disentangle; Relief
Inverse
Fire
Water
Wèi Jì [64] Unfinished; Almost complete
Mutual

month Month 11 ; Host or Controlling line : 5
蹇: 西, ; , . Jiǎn: lì xī nán, bù lì dōng běi; lì jiàn dà ren, zhēn jí.

In (the state indicated by) Jian advantage will be found in the south-west, and the contrary in the north-east. It will be advantageous (also) to meet with the great man. (In these circumstances), with firmness and correctness, there will be good fortune.

: 蹇, , . , 矣哉! 蹇西, 往; , . , 往. , . 蹇矣哉! Tuàn zhuàn: Jiǎn, nán yě, xiǎn zài qián yě. Jiàn xiǎn ér néng zhǐ, zhī yǐ zāi! Jiǎn lì xī nán, wǎng dé zhòng yě; bù lì dōng běi, qí dào qióng yě. Lì jiàn dà ren, wǎng yǒu gōng yě. Dāng wèi zhēn jí, yǐ zhèng bāng yě. Jiǎn zhī shí yòng dà yǐ zāi!

Jian denotes difficulty. There is (the trigram expressive of) peril in front. When one, seeing the peril, can arrest his steps (in accordance with the significance of the lower trigram), is he not wise? (The language of) Jian, that 'advantage will be found in the south-west,' refers to the (strong fifth line) advanced and in the central place. That 'there will be no advantage in the north-east,' intimates that the way (of dealing with the Jian state) is exhausted. That 'it will be advantageous to see the great man,' intimates that advance will lead to achievement. That the places (of the different lines after the first) are those appropriate to them indicates firm correctness and good fortune, with which the regions (of the kingdom) are brought to their normal state. Great indeed is the work to be done in the time of Jian!

: , 蹇; . Xiàng zhuàn: Shān shàng yǒu shuǐ, jiǎn; jūn zǐ yǐ fǎn shēn xiū dé.

(The trigram representing) a mountain, and above it that for water, form Jian. The superior man, in accordance with this, turns round (and examines) himself, and cultivates his virtue.

young yin young yang young yin young yang young yin changing yin
I Ching transform
Water
Fire
Jì Jì [63] Consumation; Sated
Change
: 往蹇, 誉. Chū liù: wǎng jiǎn, lái yù.

From the first ‘six’, divided, we learn that advance (on the part of its subject) will lead to (greater) difficulties, while remaining stationary will afford ground for praise.

: 往蹇誉, . Xiàng zhuàn: Wǎng jiǎn lái yù, yí dài yě.

‘Advancing will conduct to (greater) difficulties, while remaining stationary will afford ground for praise:’ - the proper course is to wait.

young yin young yang young yin young yang changing yin young yin
I Ching transform
Water
Wind
Jǐng [48] Source; Replenish
Change
: 臣蹇蹇, . Liù èr: wáng chén jiǎn jiǎn, fěi gōng zhī gù.

The second ‘six’, divided, shows the minister of the king struggling with difficulty on difficulty, and not with a view to his own advantage.

: 臣蹇蹇, 终. Xiàng zhuàn: Wáng chén jiǎn jiǎn, zhōng wú yóu yě.

‘The minister of the king struggles with difficulty on difficulty:’ - in the end no blame will be attached to him.

young yin young yang young yin changing yang young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Water
Earth
[8] Coherence; Union
Change
: 往蹇. Jiǔ sān: wǎng jiǎn lái fǎn.

The third ‘nine’, undivided, shows its subject advancing, (but only) to (greater) difficulties. He remains stationary, and returns (to his former associates).

: 往蹇, . Xiàng zhuàn: Wǎng jiǎn lái fǎn, nèi xǐ zhī yě.

‘He advances, (but only) to (greater) difficulty; he remains stationary, and returns to his former associates:’ - they, (represented in) the inner (trigram), rejoice in him.

young yin young yang changing yin young yang young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Lake
Mountain
Xián [31] Reaction; Influence
Change
: 往蹇连. Liù sì: wǎng jiǎn lái lián.

The fourth ‘six’, divided, shows its subject advancing, (but only) to (greater) difficulties. He remains stationary, and unites (with the subject of the line above).

: 往蹇连, . Xiàng zhuàn: Wǎng jiǎn lái lián, dāng wèi shí yě.

‘To advance will (only be to) encounter (greater) difficulties; he remains stationary, and unites (with the subject of the line above):’ - that is in its proper place and has the solidity (due to it in that position).

young yin changing yang young yin young yang young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Earth
Mountain
Qiān [15] Modesty; Humility
Change
: . Jiǔ wǔ: dà jiǎn péng lái.

The fifth ‘nine’, undivided, shows its subject struggling with the greatest difficulties, while friends are coming to help him.

: , . Xiàng zhuàn: Dà jiǎn péng lái, yǐ zhōng jié yě.

‘He struggles with the greatest difficulties, while friends are coming (to help him):’ - he is in the central position, and possesses the requisite virtue.

changing yin young yang young yin young yang young yin young yin
I Ching transform
Wind
Mountain
Jiàn [53] Progression; Gradual development
Change
: 往蹇硕, ; . Shàng liù: wǎng jiǎn lái shuò, jí; lì jiàn dà ren.

The topmost ‘six’, divided, shows its subject going forward, (only to increase) the difficulties, while his remaining stationary will be (productive of) great (merit). There will be good fortune, and it will be advantageous to meet with the great man.

: 往蹇硕, . , . Xiàng zhuàn: Wǎng jiǎn lái shuò, zhì zài nèi yě. lì jiàn dà ren, yǐ cóng guì yě.

‘To advance will (only) increase the difficulties, while his remaining stationary will (be productive of) great (merit):’ - his aim is to assist the (subject of the line) inside of him. ‘It will be advantageous to meet the great man:’ - by his course he follows that noble (lord of the figure).

This translation of the YiJing classic text uses the original Chinese including the Xiàng zhuàn commentary converted to modern simplified characters and pinyin. The English translation is based on William Legge (1899) which is now out of copyright. We have changed some wording and converted to American spelling. We hope to replace this with a more modern translation.
In the first few paragraphs each gua is described. The name of the gua (hexagram) is followed by the two trigrams that make it up (lake, mountain, fire, water, earth, heaven, thunder and wind). Each gua has a controlling element (earth, fire, water, metal and wood). After this information there are three related guas. The Opposite gua is the one where all yang is changed to yin and yin to yang - it is usually opposite in meaning. The Inverse gua is the gua with the order inverted so first is last and vice versa. The mutual gua is a more complex combination and re-ordering of the internal trigrams making up the gua. Then the association of the gua to the annual cycle is shown - this is the Chinese lunar month number (not Western month). The controlling or host yao is considered the most important line in the gua and is highlighted in the hexagram.
The main description for the hexagram is then followed by a section for each of the six possible changing lines which indicate the transformation into another, related gua. The text uses ‘nine’ to refer to a yang line and ‘six’ for a yin line. The pure yin and yang hexagrams have, however, a different text structure as they are so important.

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